In ERs overwhelmed by COVID-19, here’s who might get treated—and who might not

Patrick

Enlarge / NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 20: Doctors test hospital staff with flu-like symptoms for COVID-19 at St. Barnabas hospital on March 20, 2020, in New York City. St. Barnabas hospital in the Bronx set-up tents to triage possible COVID-19 patients outside before they enter the main Emergency department area. (credit: Getty | Mischa Friedman)

The new coronavirus doesn’t just kill by storming lungs and other organs. It also kills by besieging health care systems.

If left to swirl in a community unchecked for a few weeks, the virus can whip up a tsunami of cases that crash

Coronavirus: Is it too much to ask for an actual plan?

Patrick
Enlarge / To call the government’s response to the pandemic unsteady would be an understatement.

In difficult and frightening times, it’s normal for a certain amount of confusion and misinformation to spread. The existence of social media and hyperpartisan “news” outlets undoubtedly exacerbate the problem, but even those are just exaggerated versions of things that have been with us for some time.

But two things make the torrent of coronavirus misinformation distinct. The first one is simple: much of the misinformation starts at the top, where President Donald Trump seems willing to say whatever crosses his mind when he finds

Feds decline to release list of 147 nursing homes stricken by coronavirus

Patrick

Two federal agencies, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), have a list of 147 nursing homes where at least one resident has contracted COVID-19. But The Washington Post reports that the agencies are refusing to release this list to the public.

“According to CDC data shared with CMS, 147 nursing homes across 27 states have at least one resident with COVID-19,” the CMS wrote in the sixth paragraph of a Monday press release about increased nursing home inspections. But when the Post asked the CMS for the list, the agency referred

New attack on home routers sends users to spoofed sites that push malware

Patrick

A recently discovered hack of home and small-office routers is redirecting users to malicious sites that pose as COVID-19 informational resources in an attempt to install malware that steals passwords and cryptocurrency credentials, researchers said on Wednesday.

A post published by security firm Bitdefender said the compromises are hitting Linksys routers, although BleepingComputer, which reported the attack two days ago, said the campaign also targets D-Link devices.

It remains unclear how attackers are compromising the routers. The researchers, citing data collected from Bitdefender security products, suspect that the hackers are guessing passwords used to secure routers’ remote management console

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