Samsung’s Galaxy Quantum 2 has quantum cryptography in-built

Patrick

Samsung and South Korean provider SK Telecom have introduced the Galaxy Quantum 2, Samsung’s second cellphone that options built-in quantum cryptography know-how for elevated safety. It’s the follow-up to final yr’s Galaxy A Quantum.

The Quantum 2 features a chip developed by an organization known as ID Quantique, which says it’s the world’s smallest quantum random quantity generator (QRNG) at 2.5mm sq.. It really works by capturing random noise with an LED and a CMOS picture sensor. In keeping with SK Telecom, the QRNG chip “permits smartphone holders to make use of companies that require safety in a extra protected and safe method by producing unpredictable and patternless true random numbers.”

Quantum cryptography RNG is taken into account to be extraordinarily difficult to hack with out in depth bodily entry to a given system. The advantages will appear fairly area of interest to the typical buyer, however the QRNG chip does robotically work with apps that use the Android Keystore APIs, which ought to make the know-how extra accessible for builders. SK Telecom is touting native compatibility with the likes of Shinhan Financial institution and Customary Chartered Financial institution Korea, plus its personal companies like T World. The provider says it’ll work with extra companies sooner or later, together with Samsung’s personal bank cards.

The cellphone itself has moderately excessive specs, near what you’d have present in a high-end flagship cellphone from a yr or two in the past. It has a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 Plus processor, a 64-megapixel digital camera, and a 6.7-inch 120Hz OLED show.

The Galaxy Quantum 2 is barely confirmed for a launch in South Korea proper now. It’ll go on sale on April twenty third.

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